NRICH MATHS PROBLEM SOLVING KS1

Talk to your friends about how you work them out. Two Dice Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: Can you work out the domino pieces which would go in the middle in each case to complete the pattern of these eight sets of 3 dominoes? What do you notice about these squares of numbers? What Was in the Box? Can you see who the gold medal winner is? Domino Sequences Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level:

Addition and Subtraction KS1. This problem is designed to help children to learn, and to use, the two and three times tables. Will you be the first to reach the target? Circles, Circles Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level: The idea is to go round the track in as few jumps as possible.

Working Systematically at KS1 :

Age 5 to 7 Reasoning and Convincing at KS1 The tasks in this prblem can be used to encourage children to convince others of their reasoning, using ‘because’ statements. What numbers of total spots can you make? Age 7 to 11 Conjecturing and Generalising at KS2 The tasks in this collection encourage upper primary children to conjecture and generalise. In how many different ways can you break up a stick of 7 interlocking cubes?

nrich maths problem solving ks1

To support this aim, members of the NRICH team work in a wide range of capacities, including providing professional development for teachers wishing to embed rich mathematical tasks into everyday classroom practice. These lower primary tasks could all be tackled using a trial and improvement approach.

  ZESPRI KIWI CASE STUDY

If there are 3 squares in the ring, can you place three different numbers in them so that nrjch differences are odd? Tasks for KS1 children which focus on working systematically.

Use the number weights to find different ways of balancing the equaliser. How many possible necklaces can you find?

Maisy Goes Camping Age 3 to 5 Using everyday language to proglem about addition and subtraction. Unit Differences Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: Create a pattern on the left-hand grid.

Counting and Ordering KS1

The tasks in this collection encourage lower primary children to conjecture and generalise. If you hang two weights on one side of this balance, in how many different ways can you hang three weights on the other side for it to be balanced?

Little Man Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: Making Sticks Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: Can you place these quantities in order from smallest to largest? Ordered Eolving of Working Lower Primary These activities lend themselves to systematic working in the sense that it helps to have an ordered approach.

Problem Solving :

What about the silver medal winner and the bronze medal winner? How could you put these three beads into bags?

Number Book Age 3 to 5 Counting reliably with numbers from 1 to 20 Sorting and describing. Dotty Six is a simple dice game that you can adapt in many ways.

  INLEIDING THESIS KULEUVEN

Can you work out where their counters will land?

Hundred Square Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: Two Halves Age 3 to 5 Halving. How many creatures did he see? Are these statements relating to calculation and properties of shapes always true, sometimes true or never true? To support this aim, members of the NRICH team work in a wide range of capacities, including providing professional development for teachers wishing to embed rich mathematical tasks into everyday classroom practice.

These upper primary tasks could all be tackled using a trial and improvement approach. Buzzy Bee Age 5 to 7 Challenge Level: Different Sizes Age 5 to 11 Challenge Level: Ben has five coins in his pocket. How could you extend your pattern on the right-hand grid?

nrich maths problem solving ks1

If prkblem count from 1 to 20 and clap more loudly on the numbers in the two times table, as well as saying those numbers loudly, which numbers will be loud?